Tag Archive: Microsoft


An employee at an AT&T store in California revealed the Lumia 900 release date – April 8. There is still no official confirmation on this, but some previous rumors also suggested the second week of April as the release time frame.

The rumored price of the Lumia 900 is attractive at $99 (with a two-year contract, of course) and you might get a $25 gift card to use in the Marketplace as well.

Nokia and Microsoft are preparing a huge marketing (digital and TV) campaign for the Lumia 900, so it seems with the Lumia series failure is not an option for neither the companies.

Nokia has also uploaded a few new promo videos of the Lumia 900 too. Enjoy!

Source • Source 2

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According Stefania Duico, the lead of Windows Phone Italy, the Windows Phone Tango update will be officially called 7.5 Refresh. As you probably know, currently WP Mango is called just 7.5.

Adding the Refresh moniker and not changing the OS version actually makes sense, because this update major role is to lower the Windows Phone specs so less-capable devices could run it (without multi-tasking, live tiles, etc.).

The update will become available for every WP-based smartphone out there later this year. The next major release is Apollo a.k.a. Windows Phone 8. It will probably launch in Q3 this year.

Source | Via

Offerings from both Nokia and ZTE debuted the next major build of Windows Phone last week at MWC, dubbed “Tango”. The new Nokia Lumia 610 and ZTE Orbit both took to their respective stands to show off the new lower-end capabilities of Microsoft’s mobile OS.

Despite the latest iteration (excluding Apollo) of Windows Phone having made it to these devices on the floor at MWC, Microsoft had been particularly vague about just what the limitations were for devices employing lower-tiered hardware, until now.

Both the Lumia 610 and Orbit employ 256MB of RAM and this means that there are certain implications which consumers will need to bear in mind when choosing a Windows Phone device, these are as follows:

Windows Phone Marketplace app restrictions – Some processor-intensive apps have particular memory requirements, and won’t work on phones with 256MB of RAM.

Podcast/Video Podcast Subscriptions – Managing podcast subscriptions or watching video podcasts on a device with 256MB of RAM will not be possible.

Bing Local Scout – Bing Local Scout won’t feature on a device with only 256MB of RAM.

Fast app/Task switching – The feature differs on Windows Phones with 256MB of RAM in that if a single application uses over 90MB, it will be killed on exit and thus not appear in the task switcher, besides this the functionality will remain unchanged.

SkyDrive automatic photo upload – 256MB of RAM means no auto-upload option, but users will still be able to upload their photos manually.

HD video playback – Some compressed videos will be unable to play due to a lack of codec support on devices with 256MB of RAM.

Background agents – To free up RAM for the foreground on such devices, generic background agents (PeriodicTasks/ResourceIntensiveTasks) will be disabled.

As well as informing prospective buyers of these new more competitively priced Windows Phones what they’ll be missing out on, Microsoft have also made a point of appealing to Windows Phone developers who will need to take into account the limitations of devices using the new minimum hardware requirements.

Speed seems to be key with a message of optimizing app start times and reducing an apps’ memory footprint being pushed to developers. All this being said, Microsoft are adding features to Windows Phone 7.5 too, including a new location alert, MMS enhancements and improved SIM contact management.

Windows Phone “Tango” should be arriving on 256MB of RAM-endowed Windows Phone devices come Q2 this year.

Source | Via

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Nokia has sent out mails to all its Ovi Share users informing them about the sad demise of the service. For those who haven’t heard of it before, Ovi Share was Nokia’s version of Dropbox, which allowed those with an Ovi account to upload content such as images and videos from their phones onto Nokia’s servers.

Unfortunately, this service is now shutting down. After March 13, users will no longer will be able to upload files and the last date to download any files that you may have uploaded is May 30. On May 31, the service will shut down completely.

According to Nokia the Ovi Store shutdown is “part of Nokia’s revised services mission to focus on mobile and location based services“. However, you will still be able to access Nokia’s other services with your account.

Unfortunately for Symbian users, none of the major online storage services have a native app that can be used for storing your files online. Hopefully, Microsoft will release a Symbian version of their SkyDrive app, although we won’t advise holding your breath for it.

Windows 8 Consumer Preview - thumbRemember how annoying it was that there were six versions of Windows 7? Well, you’ll be glad to know there aren’t six versions of Windows 8! … There’s eight.

One of the biggest annoyances with Windows 7 was that when you went to buy a system, you had to look at which version of the operating system it came with.  Then you usually ended up having to look at a chart to remember why each version was different.  It was a bit of a pain, and one that you hoped might go away in Windows 8.  Sadly, Windows 8 Beta has learned differently.  After digging around in the Windows 8 Consumer Preview that was released the other day, they found screenshot you see above.  In short, there will be eight versions of the next iteration of the Windows operating system, and they include:

  • Windows 8 Enterprise Edition
  • Windows 8 Enterprise Eval edition
  • Windows 8 Home Basic Edition
  • Windows 8 Home Premium edition
  • Windows 8 ARM edition
  • Windows 8 Professional edition
  • Windows 8 Professional Plus edition
  • Windows 8 Starter edition
  • Windows 8 Ultimate edition

If you’ve installed the Consumer Preview you can locate this list at HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Component Based Servicing\PackageIndex\Product.

The only one that puzzles us a bit is the Enterprise Eval edition which we suspect may be short for “Evaluation,” and may be more like trial software.  We just don’t know yet.

What we do know, however, is when you head out to buy a Windows 8 machine once they are launched, you may want to take a comparison chart with you of all the features.

[via Windows 8 Beta]

Microsoft Readies Valentine’s Day Windows Patches

By Colin NeagleNetworkWorld    Feb 12, 2012 5:38 am

Microsoft Thursday said that the second Patch Tuesday of 2012 will see nine security bulletins, four of which were deemed critical.

Three of the four critical bulletins address vulnerabilities in Windows, one of which also targets an Internet Explorer flaw that Wolfgang Kandek, CTO of Qualys, says should be treated with the “highest priority.” This is because browser-based vulnerabilities have been exposed more quickly of late than those for legacy software, Kandek says.

The fourth critical bulletin targets the .NET framework and Silverlight. As for the remaining bulletins, all five are rated “important.” Four address vulnerabilities in Windows while another resolves an issue with Office and Server Software.

With the release, Microsoft will exceed the seven bulletins issued last month, as well as nearly tripling the number of vulnerabilities addressed, from eight in January to 21 this month.

RELATED: Microsoft patch blows ‘perfect game’ but sends important message

However, when the trends of the past few years are taken into account, the second Patch Tuesday of 2012 is a sign of continued progress for Microsoft security. Paul Henry, security and forensic analyst at Lumension, called this Patch Tuesday a “pretty sweet Valentine’s day” for the IT professionals responsible for implementing the bulletins, especially when compared to the last two years. Microsoft sent 12 patches and addressed 22 vulnerabilities in February 2011, a year after issuing 13 bulletins that addressed 26 vulnerabilities.

Especially coming off a similarly light January Patch Tuesday, in which seven bulletins were issued but just eight vulnerabilities were addressed, Henry says there are signs of optimism for Microsoft security.

“We’ve had two fairly light patching periods in a row, with just seven from Microsoft last month,” Henry says. “Clearly, the company’s renewed focus is paying off.”

Tuesday’s upcoming patch will bring the total number of security bulletins in 2012 to 16. In comparison, Microsoft had issued 14 combined patches in the first two months of 2011, following a light, two-patch month in January 2011.

Despite the slightly higher total in overall bulletins compared to the same time last year, Henry has said security improvements in updated versions of Microsoft products have been evident in the continued decline in security patchesIn 2011, Microsoft issued 100 patches, down from 106 the year prior. The company also saw its lowest level of bulletins rated critical in 2011, at 32, since it began issuing them monthly in 2004.

Colin Neagle covers Microsoft security and network management for Network World. Keep up with his blog: Rated Critical, follow him on Twitter: @ntwrkwrldneagle.