Tag Archive: Hewlett-Packard


HP Z1 crams a Xeon CPU, pro graphics, and a 27-inch display into an all-in-one

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hp z1

Over the years Geek.com has covered HP’s Z series of workstations a number of times. The Z marked a big step forward for HP on the design front, and a step away from one of the companies biggest fears: commoditization. It combined high-end design with HP’s established workstation formula and resulted in both an immediate hit and a much needed differentiation point from the likes of Lenovo and Dell (who were essentially sell the same computers with a lesser set of features). The Z series models, like the Z600, have been quietly doing their job for some time but now HP is back with more big news: the Z1 all-in-one workstation.

You know the deal with workstations: lots of power crammed into a loud, big, dark grey tower. While that’s the essence of what they are, IT buyers are looking for much more, including ISV certification, expandability, reliability, serviceability, and portability (at times). You’d thing a lot of this runs counter to a workstation ever landing in the all-in-one form-factor, but HP seems to have worked out a way to make it possible. Just look at the image above — the Z1 folds down, flattening the 27-inch IPS display, and opens right up. This exposes the innards for maintenance and upgrades.

And what goes inside the Z1? This can scale from a Core i3 system with integrated graphics (basically a consumer system) to a quad-core Xeon-powered workhorse with up to 32GB RAM (or 8GB ECC) and Nvidia Q4000M graphics. Other perks include a 1080p HD webcam, SRS sound, USB 3.0, Blu-ray, tool-less internal parts, and a 90% efficient PSU.

On the expandability front you’d think the Z1 would be at its weakest, but it’s not terrible. There is no dual-CPU option but it does have four memory slots and four internal expansion slots (PCIe x16 full and three miniPCIe). The bigger hurdle will be storage — it can handle either two 2.5-inch drives or a single 3.5-inch one — and displays, where users have just a single Display Port to add on one more monitor.

The Z1 will never be the beast that you can build a Z800 into but buyers will get workstation features in a handsome, quiet system that doesn’t require any more floor or desk space than a 27-inch monitor. For the majority of buyers — especially those handling workstation-lite duties, like photo editing and less intensive 3D work — the Z1 will be a great fit. If you’re doing serious geo-spatial work and crunching terabytes of data, you’ll still need a more conventional solution.

The computer starts at $1899 and will be available in April.

HP Readies Open-Source WebOS Release

By Nancy GohringComputerworld    Feb 13, 2012 9:08 pm

 

Hewlett-Packard announced plans to release the code behind webOS this September under the Apache License 2.0.

The license allows developers to mix open-source code with their own inventions and sell products using the code.

The webOS operating system was developed by Palm for phones and tablets.HP acquired Palm in 2010 and late last year announced it will no longer manufacture devices that use the software. Instead, HPsaid, it will release webOS to the open-source community.

HP laid out a timeline for releasing components of the software, starting with Enyo 2.0 and its source code. With Enyo, developers can create applications that work across different types of webOS-based devices. Enyo 2.0, released in late January as open-source software, adds support for other mobile operating systems. Now, developers can more easily write applications that work acrosswebOS , iOS and Android devices.

The full open webOS beta will be published in August, with Version 1.0 coming out in September.

In comparison, Symbian took a year and eight months to release its code, before it withered away battling new operating systems from Apple and Google.