Tag Archive: Google


The Android 4.0 ICS update marathon for the non-Nexus devices has just begun. HTC drew first blood and started seeding the latest edition of the Google OS to its Sensation XE former flagship. Also included in the package is an updated Sense UI, carrying the version number 3.6.

So far, we’ve received confirmation of the Android 4.0 update being seeded to Sensation XE units in Germany and the Nordic countries, but we expect the rest of Europe to follow soon. Global availability can’t be far away too, knowing the HTC usual practices.

You can check if the update is available for your region under Software Updates in the Settings menu. Keep in mind that the update requires a download of a file nearly 300MB in size, so you better use a Wi-Fi connection for it.

If yours isn’t among the lucky units to have the update already and you don’t feel like waiting, you can follow this link to the always useful XDA-developers forum to download the files and flash it yourselves.

Via

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Android took a major step today as Google unified it’s Google Music, Google Videos, Google Books and Android Market services into one. The new one-stop store goes by Google Play.

Google Play is Google’s effort to put all of its downloadable content, be it apps, movies, music or eBooks and make it easily accessible using Cloud syncing. This would allow you to easily get any music tracks, videos and eBooks you purchase to all of your Android devices, just like with the apps from the Android Market so far.

To make the switch from Android Market to Google Play, the search giant will release an update for the Android Market app on devices running Android 2.2 or later over the coming days. So, from now on, it’s officially Google Play, Google Play Music, Google Play Books and Google Play Movies.

How much music and videos, you ask? The company says that you can store up to 20,000 of your own songs plus any of the millions available for purchase in the Google Play itself. And with the app and video count growing literally by the minute, you can be sure that Google will certainly target global market dominance.

And to make sure it attracts more and more users, Google Play will be celebrating its launch by slashing prices on a ton of applications, books, music and movies. Sadly, the full power of Google Play will only be available in the United States at launch, while the rest of the world will have to have to sit on the sideline, looking enviously.

Finally, here’s Google’s introductory video to Google Play.

Source

jelly bean

Android fans are still struggling to get their hands on Ice Cream Sandwich, but Google is already working on Jelly Bean and now Key Lime Pie.

Product codenames are part and parcel of the technology world, with many companies choosing to go with mythological figures (Zeus, Athena), place names (Chicago, Vienna), rivers (Tualatin, Willamette), or animals (Snow Leopard, Lion) to refer to their products before they get a “real” name. With Android, Google whimsically chose to go with desserts, and has been bumping Android codenames one letter along the alphabet with each release: Cupcake, Donut, Eclair, Froyo (for “frozen yogurt”), Gingerbread, Honeycomb, and now Ice Cream Sandwich. Now comes word that the next two Android releases will be “Jelly Bean” and “Key Lime Pie.” But with the Android ecosystem still struggling to get its hands on Android 4.0 “Ice Cream Sandwich,” what can folks expect future releases to bring?

Google itself has had absolutely nothing to say publicly about future versions of Android, and — as expected — declined to comment. So these represent educated guesses about Jelly Bean and Key Lime Pie… sprinkled with a a few things we’ve heard through the grapevine.

Jelly Bean

The “Jelly Bean” name isn’t news: It’s been kicking around since mid-2011, with strong confirmations only landing when Google started gearing up for Ice Cream Sandwich. Just like ICS, Google is being tight-lipped about what it plans to include in Jelly Bean. Expect these key features.

samsung-series-5-chromebookTablets… and notebooks? — As with Android HoneyComb, Google is expected to be optimizing Jelly Bean for tablets and other large-screened devices, potentially including notebooks or netbooks that could dual boot Windows and Android, and possibly run them live side-by-side without requiring users to shut down one or the other. Although noted by only one source in the Android device industry, the rationale is apparently two-fold: Google’s Chrome OS have so far failed to gain traction amongst consumers, and tablet makers haven’t considered Ice Cream Sandwich to be a game-changer for Android in the tablet arena. If Android wants to take on the iPad, Jelly Bean will need to bring a better proposition to device makers.

Developers for Android have had to work around the crippling 50MB file size limit for a long time now. To take care of this problem, many developer devised an idea where you first download a small application from the Android Market and upon launching it will download the rest of the files from the developer’s server.

This came with its own set of problems. The user would not be aware of the total size of the app before downloading it. You were also often unable to refund an up, because by the time the additional data got downloaded, the 15 minute refund period for the app would be over.

To take care of this situation, Google has now finally increased the total application size limit to 4GB for the Android Market. But it’s a bit different than the way things work on, say, the App Store, for example.

The total apk size for the Android Market is still 50MB but now the developer can have two additional expansion files that can be 2GB each in size. The developer can store these expansion files on Google’s servers instead of their own and they will get downloaded along with the apk file. Also, the user will be made aware of the final size of the app before downloading it.

One of the advantages of having this system is that when the time comes to update the app, the user won’t have to download the entire thing again. Although the developers are free to use the expansion files whichever way they like, Google is advising them to use one of the expansion files to host all the important data and the other for updating purposes. This way, when the app needs to be updated, the developer can only modify the second expansion file and the user will only have to download it instead of the entire 4GB application all over again. Think of it as being similar to the delta updates available on iOS.

Of course, the user won’t have to worry about or even know about these things and the process or purchasing or updating will remain identical. All of this expansion files business will happen behind the scenes.

The advantage of using this method instead of the aforementioned method currently being employed by the developers is that the Android Market allows downloads to run in the background and will even let you pause and resume the download. You can use Wi-Fi or 3G to download these large apps but if you use Wi-Fi and you move out of coverage the download will automatically be paused.

Hopefully, the developers will take to this new way of distributing large apps, which should make the lives of the users a bit easier.

Source

Google Galaxy Nexus Tablet

What’s in a name? Call this guilty by association – for now – as Google has yet to confirm anything, but the company’s name has been showing up quite a bit in recently registered domains. And, if recent rumors are anything to go by, the domains just might tell us quite a bit about the search giant’s upcoming plans.

Judging by the registered domains, Google’s so called Nexus Tablet may actually come to be known as the Google Play once it begins production this April. The unknown tablet is rumored to become a direct competitor to Amazon’s Kindle Fire with a 7-inch screen of its own. And because it’s Google we’re talking about, you can bet the device will come with a nice vanilla flavor of Android 4.0.

The domains were said to have been registered by brand-shielding firm MarkMonitor, who Google regularly employes so it can hide behind Whois privacy. Some of the captured domains include: googleplayapps.com, googleplaybooks.com, googleplaydownloads.com, googleplaygames.com and googleplaymovies.com. If we were to assume this is in fact evidence of a Google-branded device, it certainly sounds like a tablet to us.

Of course, merely registering domains could mean diddly-squat. Or, and this is a big or, the company might just be preparing an announcement for a tablet called Google Play. A visit to googleplayapps.com yielded no further information. But the names themselves might be enough to go on already.

[via Geek.com]

Just a couple of days after uncovering the security loophole in iOS, whereby an application can copy the user’s entire photo library and upload it simply by asking for location information in photos and videos, The New York Times is back with similar issue found on Android devices as well.

In case of Android, the issue is a bit more worrying, as was demonstrated by the Times, using the same method they used with iOS. They built a simple time app for Android, which, in its permission dialogue, made no mention of accessing the photos on the device but simply for Internet access. This app was then able to not only access the photos on the device but also post it on a website, all behind the user’s back.

When The Verge contacted Google regarding this, it gave the typical developer argument of it being a feature and not a bug. Google said Android was designed in a way to facilitate access to your files because older devices had memory cards in them. But now that more and more Android device are having a fixed internal memory, the will be looking into adding permission for apps to access images.

Like we mentioned in our previous article regarding the iOS bug, this is no different than the way images can be access on your desktop computer. However, with Google now monitoring apps using its Bouncer program, like Apple, it too has fewer excuses to allow such behavior from apps on its store.

Android 5.0 Jelly Bean to arrive in Q2 with Chrome OS dual-boot

Ice Cream Sandwich only has a single percent of market share, but Google seems to be on the verge of releasing its successor. Latest rumors have it that Android’s next release – 5.0 Jelly Bean – will be unveiled in the second quarter of this year.

According to the often reliable DigiTimes, who quote Taiwan-based supply chain makers, Android 5.0 Jelly Bean will bring further optimizations for larger screen devices – tablets and netbook computers.

One of the key features of the upcoming Android release will be its ability to dual-boot Chrome OS. The cloud-based platform still struggles to make an impact and Google is obviously planning on using the wildly popular Android to change that.

Dual-booting will also make Android 5.0 Jelly Bean much easier to market with computer makers. Given the popularity of the Asus Transformer Prime, we guess there might be a niche for ultra-portable computers with super long battery life and good performance, even if they don’t run a regular desktop OS.

We’ll have to wait and see about that. For now we are circling June 27 on our calendars – it’s the day when the Google I/O developer event begins and if an Android 5.0 Jelly Bean announcement is to happen in Q2 – that will certainly be the place.

Source | Via

HP Readies Open-Source WebOS Release

By Nancy GohringComputerworld    Feb 13, 2012 9:08 pm

 

Hewlett-Packard announced plans to release the code behind webOS this September under the Apache License 2.0.

The license allows developers to mix open-source code with their own inventions and sell products using the code.

The webOS operating system was developed by Palm for phones and tablets.HP acquired Palm in 2010 and late last year announced it will no longer manufacture devices that use the software. Instead, HPsaid, it will release webOS to the open-source community.

HP laid out a timeline for releasing components of the software, starting with Enyo 2.0 and its source code. With Enyo, developers can create applications that work across different types of webOS-based devices. Enyo 2.0, released in late January as open-source software, adds support for other mobile operating systems. Now, developers can more easily write applications that work acrosswebOS , iOS and Android devices.

The full open webOS beta will be published in August, with Version 1.0 coming out in September.

In comparison, Symbian took a year and eight months to release its code, before it withered away battling new operating systems from Apple and Google.